Horse whisperers

I’ve been contacted by reader Gloria Wigley who left a couple of comments over the weekend about the incident with the horses stuck in the mud at Chasewater. Gloria commented on that post and subsequently on the first post I made about the matter. Gloria is mother and grandmother to the horse riders involved, and felt that I was being somewhat unfair in my coverage. When I wrote the articles in question, I was careful to avoid referencing the cause or responsibility in the matter as I wasn’t there and was taking reports from Chasewater Wildlife Group, who didn’t see how the horses came to be stuck, either. Since I didn’t know the genesis of these unpleasant events, I was careful to avoid apportioning blame.

Gloria has pointed out that the horses were apparently scared by a dog whilst over by the rugby club, and apparently bolted, shedding their riders, only to become entrapped in the mud in an effort to escape. Gloria states in her comments and correspondence that the police are actively investigating, and that the dog owner in question was unconcerned and didn’t stop to help. Gloria had this to say:

Hi Bob

Many thanks for your reply on my comments on the subject of the horses.I did as you said and read the note you put on again and I can see that you did not exactly say it was the fault of the horseowner although she felt it was aimed at her. The horses as I said were actually by the Rugby Club until a man loosed his vicious dog of the lead and it attacked my grandaughters pony which made all 3 horses bolt and head for the mud.

I did contact the Express and Star and they put a warning in the paper about the mud.I also contacted Chasewater Country Park manager to ask for more visual danger signs and for some form of  fencing around these areas of mud.They informed me that they would be getting health and safety to look at it.So far nothing seems to have been done.

I also feel dogs should be kept on leads because of this mud.My husband has lived by Chasewater all his life and he is 66 and knows how deep this mud can be.I sent another comment on your blog this morning because I did not think you had received the first one.This was mainly to thank all those who helped my daughter and the children.The man with the dog however did not even stop to see if anyone was injured.

I hope you can get it across just how dangerous this black mud is.

Regards Gloria Wigley

I will state here and now that the mud is deadly, and will continue to be so for a long time to come. Anyone venturing onto it, or causing others to do so, is worthy only of contempt. There are clear warnings posted all round the park. I reproduced the pictures – as did Chasewater Wildlife Group – in an effort to try to prevent such situations from recurring, and I will make no apologies for using strong language in my condemnation for those that recklessly dice with safety, be it theirs or that of other park users.

Out of control dogs is an ongoing problem at Chasewater, and such animals have been responsible for the killing of birds and other nuisance for quite a while now. I suspect these regrettable incidents will continue as long as it remains fashionable to posses an animal with greater mental capacity than yourself.  I urge any dog owners to take care.

If you witnessed the events discussed here, please do contact the police, or alternatively, comment or contact me and I’ll pass the information on. I’m sure all information will be gratefully received. Brownhillsbob at googlemail dot com.

I thank Gloria for her comment and contribution, and hope all involved are recovering well.

This mud is deep and deadly. Take care.
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