Time for a fillum…

IMG_0783

The great Reg ‘Aer Reg’ Fullelove: a great man and true Brownhillian.

I’m pleased to share with readers this film of Reg Fullelove, great friend and contributor to the blog, for all to enjoy.

I belive the talk captured was recorded around 2001, and it’s a fascinating, funny and touching walk down memory lane. Reg is wonderful in it, and I enjoyed every minute.

My immense gratitude is due to Reg for sharing it with David Evans, who uploaded it for me. In the length it’s uploaded, it’s a shade over 15 minutes. Hopefully the man himself can clarify when he’s passing if this is the entire video, or if the recording ends abruptly in complete form.

Thanks to Reg and David: I’m sure readers will love it.

This entry was posted in News and tagged . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Time for a fillum…

  1. david oakley says:

    Hi Bob,
    What an hilarious and instructive fifteen minutes with ‘Aer Reg’! Being of a similar age, I recognised all the items presented, but Reg’s humour in the presentation was outstanding , I must have watched the film six times, each time little memory cells recalling albeit forgotten little bits , associated with the article Reg was holding up. Babies were encased in ‘baby beds’,which were a long flannelette sleeping unit which could be folded underneath to keep the babies legs warm. Cold draughts were something of a problem, then, as coal fires and chimneys attracted cold draughts from every unprotected orifice. Removal of this garment was ‘shortening ‘ and babies legs and feet were once again visible, knitted bootees to match the babies sex, red or blue , were often the popular choice, to cover the tiny feet. Napkins were made by obtaining an 18” length of terry- towelling, cutting it into squares , and hemming two sides. Liberty bodices were a must, complemented by its rubber buttons, for both male and female babies.
    I remember my Saturday’s ha’penny , a lot of kids got a penny, but we were a big family, so a ha’penny was the norm for some years, anyway, a ha’penny was a gateway into the shop and we would gaze around with solemn eyes at the sweets displayed, pondering whether chocolate, which didn’t last you long, was a better purchase than boiled sweets, which lasted longer, but didn’t have the delectable taste of chocolate. I remember kali, you could get a one ounce triangular bag for an ha’penny. But the constant dipping of a wet finger, weakened the bag, and your purchase could end up on the floor – a sad end to a seven-days expectation. Locust bean in ‘lucky bags’ was visually off-putting , but delicious to the taste, indescribable. Really, and faint echoes of the taste still permeate my memory, long years afterwards. Beechnut spearmint cost a ha’penny out of the machine, but every fourth coin brought two packets. By observing the position of the scratches on the server wheel. It was possible to see when the next double issue was due.
    But back to ‘Aer Reg’. the comic timing was immaculate. When describing the ‘mobile phones’ an hilarious description to those who remember them, and the end of the story – the girl’s mother ‘cut the string’ !! deserved the shrieks of laughter and applause which followed the denouement.
    Reg. lad, you did us proud. You and the team of Bob and David Evans which brought this little gem to our screens, take a bow. I loved every minute of it, and I’m sure that readers, young or old will feel the same. A sincere Thank you.

  2. Clive says:

    Great video aer reg. Enjoyed every bit of it, and wanted more when it finnished. Big thank you to Reg; David and Bob

  3. aerreg says:

    thank you for your comments on memory lane sorry for the cut off but as the bbc would say this was due to a technical error which was out of my control and has been sorted the full length disc has now been made god bless from reg and agai thanks for your fellowship

  4. Pingback: Time for a full length feature with Aer Reg | BrownhillsBob's Brownhills Blog

Leave a Reply

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.